The Media that Cried “Crisis”

The word “crisis” has become quite popular in our 24-hour news cycle. It’s a word media outlets have attached to everything from student loans to weight gain to a national shortage of biscuits in an attempt to maximize the eyeballs on their content.

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “The Great British Biscuit Crisis is finally over,” from The Independent, April 7, 2016.]

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “The Strange Case of the Missing Crisis,” from The Wall Street Journal, April 8, 2016.]

However we believe most, if not all, of the issues labeled as “crises” can be solved over time, whether it’s with a long-term plan, a change in legislation or perhaps new personnel brought in at the next election.

Take, for example, the “retirement savings crisis.” It’s a term we may have heard used to describe the national financial situation, but at the individual level, it doesn’t really become an issue unless you were to run out of money. Nobody wants to leave the workforce only to realize they didn’t have enough money saved up, but we believe this is one potential challenge that can be resolved before it happens, even before you retire.

For example, you may be able to reposition income-producing assets now to become guaranteed fixed income-producing assets later.* We’re happy to consult with you about how this can be accomplished, and help determine whether it’s a viable option for your individual financial situation.

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “How to Solve America’s Retirement Crisis,” from Time, 2016.]

When it comes to finances, the challenges you may encounter differ from anybody else’s. During the last recession, generally middle- and lower-class workers got hit the hardest. Many homeowners became renters, and some renters became homeless. Meanwhile, some higher net worth folks reined in spending, so second homes and other luxuries got put on hold.

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “American Dream Lost: Financial Crisis Created Massive Shift of Homeowners to Renters,” from News One, April 8, 2016.]

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “How to Solve the Housing Crisis: More Lawyers,” from Bloomberg, April 8, 2016.]

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Election, economy hit vacation homebuyers where they live,” from CNBC, April 6, 2016.]

A financial professional may be able to help you create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance and investment products to help you meet your retirement income goals. If you have questions or need assistance, please keep us in mind.

*Any guarantees and protections are provided by insurance products including annuities that are backed by the financial strength and claims-paying ability of the issuing insurer.

This material has been prepared for our firm and contains general information to help you understand basic financial planning strategies that may help you work toward your financial goals. Please understand that we cannot make any promises or guarantees that you will accomplish such goals.  All investments are subject to risk including the complete loss of principal.

Throughout, we may generally discuss different financial vehicles; however, nothing contained herein should be construed as a recommendation to buy or sell any financial vehicle, nor should it be used to make decisions about your investments.

The information contained in this material has been obtained from third-party sources believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions.
If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

Financial Markets and Presidential Elections

There’s a saying that with enough prodding, you can make statistics say whatever you want.

We believe this is especially true for the loads of data surrounding presidential elections. It’s possible to use the data to say two different things about the economy, depending on the point you’re trying to make.

For example, one analyst reported that since 1929, the S&P 500 gained an average of 1.58 percent in a president’s first year in office. Another claimed that since 1928, the first year of a new presidential term sees “the markets” rise by an average of 6 percent. Citing different indexes and years can change the story.

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Why markets tend to fall during a presidential election year,” from CNBC, Jan. 13, 2016.]

In our opinion, the important thing to remember is that investing is personal. Trying to predict market performance based on the direction of prices, interest rates or presidential elections is not a sound long-term strategy. If it was, more people would be successful at doing it. Please remember that investing involves risk, including the potential loss of principal. No investment strategy can guarantee a profit or protect against loss in periods of declining values.

This election year promises to have even more fireworks than usual, but don’t let national matters distract from your personal long-term financial goals. We’re help to help you stay on track. With that being said, take a look at what different analysts say about the financial markets and presidential elections.

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “What Investors Need to Know About the 2016 Election,” from Oppenheimer Funds, Jan. 8, 2016.]

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “How Do Stock Markets Perform during a Presidential Election Year?” from Yahoo Finance, April 1, 2016.]

If there’s one thing that is for sure, it’s that a presidential election year creates more market uncertainly than non-election years. Most analysts agree that markets tend to be calmer when an incumbent president is running for re-election, because one known entity is more reassuring than two unknowns. The same seems to hold true if the incumbent wins re-election. However, the stock market may trend downward in the first year of a new party taking over the White House.

It’s also probably true that, depending on which party is in control, certain industries may be positively or negatively affected. For example, if the next president successfully repeals the Affordable Care Act, the health care industry would be poised for changes.

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “How the Presidential Election Will Affect the Stock Market,” from Kiplinger, February 2016.]

At least one analyst has considered how a Donald Trump administration would impact the markets, ranging from higher import tariffs, which would make some products more expensive, to lower income taxes, which could prompt higher household spending in the consumer discretionary sector.

At the end of the day, it’s important to remember that dozens of factors impact the performance of the markets — and most investors have absolutely no control over any of them. What’s important is that you stay focused on your long-term  financial strategy with regard to whether it’s on track to meet your retirement goals.

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “How would a Donald Trump presidency affect the stock market?” from Los Angeles Times, March 7, 2016.]

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance and investment products to custom suit their needs and objectives.

This material has been prepared for our firm and contains general information to help you understand basic financial planning strategies that may help you work toward your financial goals. Please understand that we cannot make any promises or guarantees that you will accomplish such goals.  All investments are subject to risk including the complete loss of principal.

Throughout, we may generally discuss different financial vehicles; however, nothing contained herein should be construed as a recommendation to buy or sell any financial vehicle, nor should it be used to make decisions about your investments.

The information contained in this material has been obtained from third-party sources believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions.

If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

The Art of Intelligence Open to Interpretation

Albert Einstein once said, “The true sign of intelligence is not knowledge, but imagination.” People may have different views on that point. Would someone with an MBA from Harvard be considered more intelligent than a painter with an art degree?

Certainly, it’s an open discussion. Regardless of who attends college or what profession they pursue, intelligence is not relegated to the well-off. Doctors and lawyers have earned the right to be highly respected and paid, but they may not necessarily be more intelligent than someone who couldn’t afford that caliber of education.

We believe that keeping their children on track for a dream profession or education is a top priority for parents, but perhaps enrolling in full-day kindergarten or an overly structured preschool may be a step too far. Lego recently conducted a study placing more importance on creative play than receiving formal education at a young age. It’s an interesting concept, as it weighs more toward Einstein’s theory of intelligence than we generally associate with our common core standards and higher-learning institutions.

One of the biggest concerns for many who do attend the finest educational institutions is often affordability, but the challenges don’t stop there. Some may hesitate to venture out of their comfort zones, asking what they may consider “stupid” questions in front of their peers. However, the main purpose in the classroom is to learn. We believe learning doesn’t stop in the classroom; some experts believe that a willingness to admit what you don’t know is the mark of a good manager.

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Children Should Learn Mainly Through Play Until the Age of Eight, Says Lego,” from The Guardian, March 15, 2016.]

[CLICK HERE to view the video, “Are Good Managers Born or Made?” from Knowledge@Wharton, March 15, 2016.]

Without proper guidance, the financial industry can be one of those areas that make people feel like they’re not that smart. The truth is, you can spend a lifetime in this field and still not know everything. It evolves, and there’s always some new trend, product or phenomenon that we must analyze and figure out how it may impact our clients’ financial goals.

We want you to know that we’re here to help do that. You can come to us, regardless of your education on the matter, and we will help find answers to your questions based on your individual needs and objectives.

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “5 Reasons You Need a Financial Advisor in 2016,” from Guide Vine, Jan. 6, 2016.]

Not all of us are academics. With the Internet at our fingertips, there are more methods than ever to gain knowledge without entering a classroom. For some, it’s just a matter of priority and focus. Studies have found that focus is less about zoning in and more about ignoring extraneous distractions. If you can master the art of “blocking out,” your ability to learn gets much easier.

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Learning what to ignore is a powerful tool for improving your focus,” from World Economic Forum, March 9, 2016.]

Certainly Thomas Jefferson was not fully on board with the idea of formal classroom learning. He advocated education through exploration not confined to a specific major or course of study. After all, students used to go to college to figure out what they wanted to be when they grew up. These days, students are encouraged to declare their major within their first year or two and spend their learning time preparing for a specific occupation.

There’s learning for the sake of information, and then there’s learning for the sake of accomplishing a specific goal. Perhaps Einstein fully explains this best. In his own words: “Imagination is more important than knowledge. For knowledge is limited to all we now know and understand, while imagination embraces the entire world, and all there ever will be to know and understand.”

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Thomas Jefferson would not have liked this college trend,” from The Washington Post, March 18, 2016.]

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Creativity and learning for the Conceptual Age,” from The Brookings Institution, March 14, 2016.]

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance and investment products to custom suit their needs and objectives.

This material has been prepared for our firm and contains general information to help you understand basic financial planning strategies that may help you work toward your financial goals. Please understand that we cannot make any promises or guarantees that you will accomplish such goals. All investments are subject to risk including the complete loss of principal.

Throughout, we may generally discuss different financial vehicles; however, nothing contained herein should be construed as a recommendation to buy or sell any financial vehicle, nor should it be used to make decisions about your investments.

The information contained in this material has been obtained from third-party sources believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

The Value of Optimism

Anyone approaching the end of their working years can likely list more than a few occurrences in which they’ve experienced a stressful moment or handled a hectic ordeal.

Although retiring may end the need to put out fires in the workplace, stress built up over the years does take its toll and, for some, may contribute to a more negative outlook.

One study of optimism claims that while everyone is born optimistic, 95 percent of adults tend to be pessimists. Perhaps part of the maturation process is to grow more cynical; we know things won’t always work out, so pessimism may seep into our psyche.

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Are you born to be an Optimist?” from Think Positive! Mag, February 2016.]

We believe one area where it’s important to keep optimism and pessimism in check is in the financial industry. Working with a financial advisor, as opposed to simply following market forecasters, may help ensure your decisions are balanced and on track for your retirement income goals.

While our focus is on helping you create a retirement income strategy you can feel confident about, professionals in other areas are making strides in the research of stress management. One recent study looked into what’s known as the “placebo effect” — when the pain is real, but the cure is fake. Research has shown that chronic stress and depression can contribute to physical ailments, but new theories are now exploring the flip side of that impact: the mind’s potential to heal.

Scientists recently discovered that when trial participants unknowingly respond to a placebo, their easement of pain is not imaginary. The effects are just as real as relief provided by a chemical drug.

Another example involves a study of over 1,000 patients with chronic back pain. One group was given acupuncture, the practice of alleviating pain by puncturing specific areas of the skin with needles. The second group was given “fake acupuncture,” in which the needles were placed in the wrong places and didn’t fully penetrate the skin. No significant difference was experienced between the two groups’ results.

However, a third group in the trial was given no acupuncture; instead they were prescribed conventional treatments of pain killers, physiotherapy and exercise. Interestingly, both acupuncture groups did twice as well as the group that took the drugs.

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Chronic Stress: A Case of Mind Over Matter?” from Knowledge@Wharton, March 4, 2016.]

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Positive thinking: Stop negative self-talk to reduce stress,” from Mayo Clinic, 2016.]

Cognitive-based approaches such as hypnosis, acupuncture and distraction have already been proven to reduce pain. Now, new research from a Carnegie Mellon University study shows that “mindfulness meditation” can alter brain connectivity patterns to generate improvements in inflammation.

Alas, everybody gets aches and pains in our bodies. Perhaps a little mindful optimism can help alleviate some of that discomfort.

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Neurobiological Changes Explain How Mindfulness Meditation Improves Health,” from Carnegie Mellon University, Feb. 4, 2016.]

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Mindfulness meditation provides opioid-free pain relief, study finds” from Science Daily, March 15, 2016.]

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance and investment products to custom suit their needs and objectives.

This material has been prepared for our firm and contains general information to help you understand basic financial planning strategies that may help you work toward your financial goals. Please understand that we cannot make any promises or guarantees that you will accomplish such goals. All investments are subject to risk including the complete loss of principal.

Throughout, we may generally discuss different financial vehicles; however, nothing contained herein should be construed as a recommendation to buy or sell any financial vehicle, nor should it be used to make decisions about your investments.

The information contained in this material has been obtained from third-party sources believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

Watching the Markets with Interest

In March, the Federal Reserve decided to reign in its plan for raising rates this year, reducing the expected number of rate increases from four to two.

The Federal Open Market Committee came away from its most recent meeting projecting an interest rate hike of .50 percent, down from the original projection of 1 percent. According to the article’s author, the Fed is waiting for tighter credit spreads and higher inflation expectations before making additional increases.

In the short term, we believe this news could be good for the bond market, permitting income investors an attractive entry point to invest at potentially higher yields. In the domestic credit market, longer maturities in investment-grade corporate bonds offer attractive spreads, supported by both corporate fundamentals and the Fed policy.

Despite the fact that manufacturing in the U.S. has experienced a downward slide in employment numbers, it produces approximately 65 percent of S&P 500 earnings. There are signs that U.S. manufacturing output is growing thanks to domestic demand, touting 3.3 percent growth over the past year. It is our belief that further growth, low unemployment and inflation near the 2 percent target could prove to be a catalyst for the Federal Reserve to move interest rates higher.

For more information on how the latest market trends may impact your retirement income strategy, feel free to give us a call.

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Looking for yield in all the right places: A post-FOMC playbook” from Columbia Threadneedle, March 21, 2016.]

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Rumors of the industrial sector’s demise are greatly exaggerated” from Columbia Threadneedle, March 28, 2016.]

We believe markets like certainty, but that’s something we lack in abundance thanks to this topsy-turvy election year. Oil prices continue to fall, and the only certainty is that they can’t keep falling forever.

In the fixed income market, many portfolio managers are recommending that investors resist chasing yield, diversify their holdings and seek out solid, risk-adjusted returns. According to the article, “5 Rules for Avoiding Bond Portfolio Purgatory”, “Consistency of results is far more important than absolute returns in any given year.”

View the provided link to read the article, “5 Rules for Avoiding Bond Portfolio Purgatory” from Forbes, March 23, 2016: http://www.forbes.com/sites/investor/2016/03/23/5-rules-for-avoiding-bond-portfolio-purgatory/#1d9a5fe97029

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance and investment products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material has been prepared for our firm and contains general information to help you understand basic financial planning strategies that may help you work towards your financial goals. Please understand that we cannot make any promises or guarantees that you will accomplish such goals.  All investments are subject to risk including the complete loss of principal.

Throughout, we may generally discuss different financial vehicles; however, nothing contained herein should be construed as a recommendation to buy or sell any financial vehicle, nor should it be used to make decisions about your investments.

The information contained in this material has been obtained from third party sources believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

Longer Lifespans Translating to Change of Scenery

Men may now be living longer than ever, but, from a location standpoint, retirees are doing anything but staying put.

Women still live longer than men, but the gap has narrowed, as the lifespan of males has increased consistently over the past few decades. This means the chances are now greater that a married woman will spend more time in retirement with her spouse than as a widow.

Retirees are making the most of their time together by branching out to new territory. It used to be that people up north braved formidable winters throughout their working lives, then retired to Florida or Arizona. Now, there are spots all over the country that attract retirees with affordable living options, in addition to moderate year-round temperatures.

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Fewer Retirees are Living Alone” from U.S. News & World Report, Feb. 19, 2016.]

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Americans less prepared for longer lives” from Palo Alto Online, March 4, 2016.]

Wyoming has become a trendy destination for retirees seeking low taxes, good weather, soothing hot springs and a low crime rate — not to mention attracting the grandchildren with trips to Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks.

On the other side of the country, retirees over the age of 60 in Columbia, South Carolina, can take free classes at the University of South Carolina. Housing is also affordable, costing a retiree with a paid-off mortgage an average of $367 a month.

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “The 10 Best States for Retirement” from Fox Business, March 1, 2016.]

That’s not bad, considering the average Social Security benefit for retired workers was $1,335 per month in 2015. With a well-thought-out retirement income strategy, you could live comfortably. Having time to enjoy retirement with a spouse is great, as is the ability to travel the country together, but couples should still have a contingency retirement income plan for whichever spouse lives longer.

One study concluded that, despite the smaller gap between genders, about half of women over age 65 will still spend at least 10 years without a spouse. We make a point of talking about the potential for this scenario with all of our clients. If you’d like to learn more about retirement income strategies that may be suitable for you, please give us a call.

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Social Security Basic Facts” from Social Security Administration, Oct. 13, 2015.]

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “10 Best Places to Retire on Social Security Alone” from U.S. News & World Report, Oct. 14, 2014.]

The U.S. Census Department recently released data showing that for people age 55 and older, housing is their greatest expense. It’s important to have a plan to reduce this expense once you’re retired, especially since — at later ages — health care expenses are likely to increase.

Perhaps the most influential factor in retirement today, and certainly in the future, is our longer life expectancy. It’s one thing to talk about longevity in statistical terms, but it’s far more important that we look at this reality up close and personal and create a strategy for it.

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “A closer look at spending patterns of older Americans” from U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, March 3, 2016.]

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance and investment products to custom suit their needs and objectives.

The information contained in this material is provided by third parties and has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions.

If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

Jobs, Wages, GDP Potential Areas of Growth in 2016

By many measures, the country’s economy is continuing on its upward trend.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported 242,000 new jobs in February 2016, with the unemployment rate unchanged at 4.9 percent. Industries with the highest number of jobs gains were health care and social assistance, retail trade, food and beverage and private educational services.

While these industries may have the highest number of jobs available, they’re not necessarily the highest-paying jobs. With the exception of doctors, most of the highest salaries go to people who work in the technology industry or hold a mid-level position that requires data analysis for strategy and product management.

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Employment Situation Summary” from U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, March 4, 2016.]

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “25 Highest Paying Jobs in America” from GlassDoor.com, March 9, 2016.]

Another bit of good news is that, according to one 2016 salary forecast, workers across the country are expected to receive their biggest pay increase in three years. In many households, that may be the most significant indicator that the economy is recovering.

However, one of the lessons we learn from stagnant wages is how to “tighten the belt” and live on less. Just remember that if you do get a significant raise this year, one of the possible ways to utilize it is by investing. The more you invest today, and the longer your money has time to grow, the greater the potential for higher income in retirement. Please remember that investing involves risk, including the potential loss of principal. No investment strategy can guarantee a profit or protect against loss in periods of declining values. If you’d like to discuss ways to potentially optimize an increase in household income this year, let’s talk.

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Employees Will Get the Biggest Salary Increase in Years In 2016” from FastCompany, Jan. 11, 2016.]

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “United States Wages and Salaries Growth Forecast 2016-2020” from Trading Economics, 2016.]

The combination of lower unemployment and higher wages also means people may be able to spend more money. This, in turn, drives economic growth, as is reflected in the 2016 outlook for the nation’s GDP. Greater consumption may also lead to higher production, distribution, revenues and return on investment for investors.

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “GDP Growth Slowed by Strong Dollar’s Drag” from Kiplinger, Feb. 26, 2016.]

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “This map will change the way you see the US economy” from World Economic Forum, Feb. 15, 2016.]

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance and investment products to custom suit their needs and objectives.

The information contained in this material is provided by third parties and has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions.

If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

How to Cope With Market Volatility

The investment markets had a rocky start in 2016, and many analysts believe market volatility may continue to be a theme throughout the year.

Market volatility is a tough factor to deal with. It inherently makes us want to react, to change, to make things smooth and even keel. It may cause stress when you know that your investments can be impacted by elements completely out of your hands.

But there is something you can control in that regard. It’s your financial objectives — your short- and long-term goals. If you’ve put strategies in place to help reach those goals, we believe volatility shouldn’t necessitate changes in most situations.

We always talk about “staying the course” but recognize that it’s easier said than done. If your situation changes, if your financial goals change or if you just need reassurance that your financial plan is on track for your retirement income goals, feel free to reach out — that’s what we’re here for. And periodically, we’ll reach out to you to help reassess your plan and ensure it’s still on track.

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Poll: What the Market Volatility Is Telling Investors,” from Morningstar, Feb. 21, 2016.]

The Greek philosopher, Heraclitus of Ephesus, is quoted as the first to state, “Change is the only constant in life.” The same is true with investment markets. Today, there are plenty of people with their own philosophies on how to manage the constancy of change in the investment industry.

Jack Bogle, founder of the Vanguard Group, reiterates his mantra that investors should “stay the course” in this volatile market. He offers a rule-of-thumb strategy for volatility: 60 percent to 40 percent stock-to-bond ratio. In his words, “If you’re younger, a lot higher, if you’re older … somewhat lower.”

We believe this may be good advice in general, but it doesn’t take into account personal factors such as investment timeline and tolerance for risk. For that, you should consider working with a financial advisor to discuss your financial situation, risk tolerance and investment objectives. We will work with you to identify strategies utilizing both investment and insurance products that may help you address your concerns.

[CLICK HERE to read the article/view the video, “Don’t panic about market volatility: Jack Bogle,” from CNBC, Feb. 17, 2016.]

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Mitigating the financial and emotional impact of market volatility,” from Columbia Threadneedle, Feb. 8, 2016.]

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Personal Investment Strategies for Volatile Times,” from Knowledge@Wharton, Feb. 16, 2016.]

Market volatility frequently drives investors into more “safe-haven” financial products, such as CDs and cash. However, your safe haven today won’t necessarily be a safe haven when you retire. Small returns and low yields that do not keep up with the cost of living can put your retirement income in a challenging position.

The reality is that we as individuals can’t control the markets. When large numbers of investors all commit the same actions — such as invest in a certain company and drive up its price, or sell and drop it precipitously — we can influence the price of individual stocks. But there are far greater and overarching economic forces that impact market performance, such as oil production and the direction of interest rates.

All we can really do is control our own actions — and, as Bogle suggests, take our emotions out of the picture and rely on a retirement strategy designed to meet our personal goals. That’s exactly what we’re here to help you do.

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Investment Insights: No Relief,” from Merrill Lynch, Jan. 9, 2016.]

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Vanguard CEO: Expect a lot less from stocks for a decade,” from CNBC, Jan. 25, 2016.]

Investing involves risk, including the potential loss of principal. No investment strategy can guarantee a profit or protect against loss in periods of declining values. Any references to steady and reliable income streams refer only to fixed insurance products. They do not refer in any way to securities or investment advisory products.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance and investment products to custom suit their needs and objectives. The information contained in this material is provided by third parties and has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

Woman’s Way Event

Join Us for a Woman’s Way Workshop

JOIN US TO:
Understand “who you are” financially.
Learn how to avoid the common mistakes of retirement. 
Understand why you need a financial strategy.
Make your retirement
income last regardless of how long you live.

 

A Fun & Educational Girls Night Out!

Join us for an Event created By Women, For Women!

THURSDAY, APRIL 21ST, 2016 AT 6:30 PM

Did you know that women control 60% of the nation’s wealth, yet receive less in Social Security benefits than men? A longer life expectancy and increased choice to remain single means women have more financial responsibility than ever before!

 

Your host and speaker will be Wendy J. Wallace of Lighthouse Financial Group, LLC. While many retiree’s lost precious money they couldn’t afford to lose, none of her clients lost a dime during the market’s volatility in 2008-09 utilizing the avenues she recommended!

 

This is a terrific opportunity to get a better grasp of financial and retirement planning in a non-threatening and empowering environment. Expect to have fun and learn some valuable information!

RESERVE YOUR SPOT NOW!

 

Please call or email us for reservations!

*Reservations are REQUIRED.

Seating is limited and space fills quickly!

 

(912) 354-4200

A Smart Woman’s Retirement

Come learn how to handle your financial affairs from a woman’s perspective.

DID YOU KNOW…

That as a woman, you control 60% of the nation’s wealth yet receive less in Social Security benefits than men? A longer life expectancy, and increased choice to remain single, means women have more financial responsibility than ever. In fact, according to the Investment Company Institute, 9 out of 10 women will become wholly responsible for their finances sometimes during their lifetime.

Is your income from Social Security and/or Pension enough?

Beneficial topics to be covered:

  • Why you should never leave all the money matters to your husband or partner.
  • Filling the income gap between Social Security and Pension benefits.
  • Protect your lifestyle and finances from run-away inflation and market volatility.
  • Protecting your assets from nursing home spend-down.
  • Avoiding common and costly mistakes with your IRAs/401Ks.
  • Understanding the 3 phases of money and what you should do now.
  • How to guarantee lifetime income utilizing effective strategies.

Those who attend Wendy’s seminars say they feel more informed and empowered as they plan their retirement years.

Your host and speaker will be Wendy J. Wallace of Lighthouse Financial Group, LLC. While many retirees have lost precious money they can’t afford to lose, none of her clients during the market’s volatility in 2008-09 lost a dime in the avenues she recommended.

Bellas  Tuesday, March 29, 2016 at 6:30 PM

Reservations are REQUIRED! Seating is limited and fills quickly.

To reserve your seats, please call (912) 354-4200.

This is a terrific opportunity to get a better grasp of financial and retirement planning in a non-threatening, empowering, environment. Expect to have fun and learn some valuable information!

And of course… CHOCOLATE will be served!